The Brent Shapiro Foundation for Drug Awareness was created because the disease of alcohol and drug dependence is now reaching epidemic proportions.

This disease, it is an “equal opportunity” disease that is indiscriminate, affecting all ages from children to the elderly; the rich and poor alike; the educated and uneducated; male and females; and single individuals and families.
Alcohol and drug dependency is an out of control disease that is ruining and taking the lives of our young people.
Every person in America is affected by alcohol and drug dependence and its consequences – either personally, at home, in the workplace, as victims of crimes, and/or as a taxpayer.
America’s leading social problems: crime, child and spousal abuse, and homelessness, can be directly related to substance abuse:

It is also a costly plague that wrecks lives and families and costs society billions of dollars in direct and hidden costs.
It destroys the health of the dependent person and causes illness, injuries, and death; permanently damages their interpersonal relationships, and in many cases, destroys their ability to maintain a job and support themselves and their families.
Business pays millions of dollars in lost work hours, workplace accidents, and poor work performance due to alcohol and drug dependence.
The government pays millions of dollars to incarcerate addicts for use, dealing, and associated crimes perpetrated to pay for alcohol and drug addicts.
On the treatment side, most of the children and adults who have dependency problems do not receive treatment, will not receive effective treatment, or will not receive treatment until they are put into the legal system or the hospital after years of abuse.

Despite heroic efforts by treatment providers, the vast majority of persons receiving treatment for alcohol and/or drug problems will relapse.
Alcohol and drug abuse problems are chronic, such that even persons trying to quit may do so multiple times before achieving success at sobriety.
The sad truth is that only a minority of persons currently treated for alcohol and/or drug problems will remain sober in the long-term.